Child Custody

While most divorces are emotionally complex, they’re far more challenging when children are involved. Our goal is always to resolve child custody issues with your children’s welfare as the top priority.  Some of the most common terms in custody cases are:

  • Joint custody, when parents can set aside their personal conflicts and make joint decisions for their children.
  • Sole custody, giving one parent authority to make the major decisions involving the children.
  • Residential or physical custody, deciding where and with which parent the children will reside.
  • Visitation, a specific schedule describing when the children will spend time with the non-custodial parent.
“Thanks to Mr. Tzinberg’s representation, I have custody of my kids, and enjoy a peaceful home with all of them. He was able to anticipate some of my ex-wife’s lawyer’s moves and was prepared to handle them in Court.”
—R.H.  

Removal

If you or your former partner wishes to relocate to another state with the children, this is an issue separate from custody called removal.  While the court uses a best-interest-of-the-child test for both custody and removal issues, the standard for removal is different from that in a custody matter.  It is important that your lawyer understands the differences when pursuing these issues and we are always up to date on recent case law.

“Though child removal cases can be long and difficult, I always felt good knowing that Scott was handling my case. He handled every detail as if I were a close personal friend, and he always made me feel as if my case were the only one he was working on.”
—M.Z.

Child Support

In most cases, the parent who is not awarded residential or physical custody is required to pay child support to the other parent. Illinois law follows guidelines for calculating child support, based on the number of children in your case. The Court can, however, deviate from these guidelines.  The Court will also address expenses like daycare, health insurance, and extracurricular activities.

Child support typically terminates when a child turns 18 and graduates from high school. However, there are circumstances when support can continue—for instance, in situations where a child is physically or mentally disabled. The Court also retains jurisdiction to determine what, if any, contributions parents must make toward college expenses like tuition, room and board, travel and books.

In every case involving child custody, removal and/or child support, our top priority is making sure you get the best results for your children.

Please contact us for a free, face-to-face consultation.

We handle cases throughout Cook, Lake, Will and DuPage Counties. Please call or send an email, so we can schedule your free initial consultation.